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Article on Salon.com "How do I become an adult?"

Rachel Estapa

This is a recent article on Salon.com titled "How do I become an adult?" A question I ask myself often.  Please follow the link to the article, and below, I included my response that I submitted to Salon.com. Please share your thoughts on this extremely personal, yet widely felt, topic. [response to article]

I recently asked myself the same question

My response to this is: there is no response to this, because it's all to human and we often forget we are simply that. I'm 25, recently went through the pangs of   unemployment, fretting myself over billsand rent and that looming sense of "what do I do now??" -- while my previous, collegiate life was shimmer gold like no-other, filled with accolade, work, friends and all the things to distract me from my real self. You didn't say what your passion was- so I'm assuming you're embarrassed to say it. Like me, I often suffer from that strange symptom too -- afraid to share with the universe what I love; fearing that the universe won't love me back.

That yearning, calling, desire to flourish, desire to reach your potential is what I call the "souls lubricant." But without motion, no action occurs. You said you read all these self-help books. Practice them, but create your own manual just for you. Something is lacking in the way we are taught: all learning, no practice. And I have the most difficulty with this too. Practice what our positive psychology book suggest. The interventions help. There's no goal to them; they are a self-reflective journey. Until we start seeing ourselves as experts on ourselves, we'll constantly look elsewhere in hopes to find the balm we need, when really, it's already hidden in our own way of thinking. The world, yourself, your parents, your TV will always have a list of "see, this is what you need to do." It breaks my heart to know our age group feels this way; but I believe it's necessary because on the other side of this grief is it's counterpart: relief. You just have to believe going through this is worth it.

Take care,

Rachel